Editorial Board

Editor in Chief

Marc Langheinrich is a professor in the Faculty of Informatics at Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI) in Lugano, Switzerland, where he heads the Research Group for Ubiquitous Computing. His main research interest lies at the intersection of privacy and ubiquitous computing. Langheinrich received his PhD in computer science from ETH Zürich.

Associate Editors in Chief

Steve Hodges leads the Sensors and Devices research group at Microsoft Research Cambridge and is a visiting professor at the School of Computing Science, Newcastle University. His interests broadly fall into two categories: novel electronic devices, and new technologies and techniques for interaction. He has a PhD in robotics and computer vision from Cambridge University.

Stephen S. Intille is an associate professor of computer and information science and health sciences at Northeastern University. His research interests include sensor-driven health technologies, context awareness for mobile and ubiquitous computing systems, and interactive systems for measuring and motivating health-related behavior change. Intille has a PhD in media arts and sciences from MIT.

Fahim Kawsar leads IoT research at Nokia Bell Labs Cambridge and holds a Design United Professorship at TU Delft. His current research explores novel algorithms and system design techniques to build multisensory software systems for disruptive mobile, wearable, and IoT services. At heart, he is an experimental computer scientist who aims at building end-to-end systems with real-world deployment. Fahim has a PhD in computer science from Waseda University and has worked before at Nokia Research and Lancaster University.

Nic Lane is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Oxford. He specializes in the study of efficient machine learning under computational constraints, and over the last three years has pioneered a range of embedded and mobile forms of deep learning. He holds a PhD in computer science from Dartmouth College. More information is available from at http://niclane.org.

Florian Michahelles heads the Web of Systems research group at Siemens Corporate Technology in Berkeley, California. Together with academic partners, as well as startups and corporate research groups, his team creates novel IoT solutions based on existing industry standards and advanced web and interface technologies. Florian also teaches at UC Berkeley. He holds a PhD in computer science from ETH Zürich.

Mirco Musolesi is a Reader in Data Science at University College London (UCL), and a Turing Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute, the UK national institute for data science. He leads UCL’s Intelligent Social Systems Lab, working in sensing, modelling, understanding, and predicting human behavior and social dynamics from the digital traces we generate daily in our online and offline lives. Mirco holds a PhD in computer science from UCL.

Editor in Chief Emeriti

Nigel Davies is a professor of computer science at Lancaster University. His research interests include systems support for mobile and pervasive computing. He focuses in particular on the challenges of creating deployable mobile and ubiquitous computing systems that can be used and evaluated “in the wild.”

Maria R. Ebling is a research staff member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where she manages a group building middleware to support context-sensitive computing with a focus on user privacy concerns. Her research interests include pervasive computing, context-aware computing, mobile computing, distributed systems, privacy, and human-computer interaction. She received her PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Roy Want is a research scientist at Google. His research interests include mobile and ubiquitous computing, wireless protocols, embedded systems, and automatic identification. He received his PhD for his work on “reliable management of voice in a distributed system” from Cambridge University. While at Olivetti Research (1988–91), he developed the Active Badge, a system for automatically locating people in a building. He joined Xerox PARC’s Ubiquitous Computing program in 1991 and led a project called PARCTab, one of the first context-aware computer systems. In 2000, he joined Intel Labs, where he held the position of senior principal engineer working on the Dynamic Composable Computing project. He is currently chair of ACM SIGMOBILE, and a Fellow of IEEE and the ACM.

Mahadev “Satya” Satyanarayanan is the Carnegie Group Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University. He’s an experimental computer scientist who has pioneered research in mobile and pervasive computing, including his work on the open source Coda File System and Odyssey, a set of open source operating system extensions (both part of CMU’s Project Aura). He has also worked on Internet Suspend/Resume and is a coinventor of many supporting technologies, such as data staging, lookaside caching, translucent caching, and application-aware adaptation. He is a fellow of ACM and IEEE, and the founding editor in chief of IEEE Pervasive Computing.

Editorial Board

Florian Alt is Professor of Usable Privacy and Security at the Research Institute for Cyber Defense at the University of the German Federal Armed Forces in Munich (Bundeswehr University Munich). Beyond human factors in security-critical systems, Florian’s interests are in interactive surfaces, gaze interaction, virtual reality, and automotive user interfaces. Florian obtained his PhD from the University of Stuttgart.

Oliver Amft (Wearable Computing department editor) is the founding professor of the Chair of eHealth and mHealth in the Institute of Medical Informatics of FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg. He is interested in digital health, wearable devices, multimodal context awareness, and biomedical sensor technology. He received his PhD in electrical engineering and information technology from ETH Zurich.

Mary Baker (Notes from the Community department editor) is a senior research scientist at HP Labs. Her research interests include distributed systems, networks, mobile systems, and digital preservation. She received her PhD in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of USENIX, ACM, and IEEE.

A.J. Brush (Smart Homes department editor) is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research. Her research interests span a range of areas related to using sensing, inference, and novel interaction methods to develop new experiences in the home and for families. Specific areas of interest include home automation, the Internet of Things, sustainability, field deployments of technology, and human-computer interaction in general. She received her PhD in computer science from the University of Washington.

Sarah Clinch (Conferences department editor) is a computer science researcher and lecturer in the School of Computer Science at the University of Manchester. She previously held visiting positions at the University of Cambridge, TU Dresden, and Carnegie Mellon University. Her research focuses on the development and deployment of data-centric pervasive computing architectures for new and emerging application domains. Sarah holds a PhD from the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University.

Sunny Consolvo is a user experience researcher at Google. Her research interests include human-computer interaction, persuasive technologies, ubiquitous computing systems, mobile computing, and web technologies. She has also investigated how to use technology to encourage health and wellness—particularly physical activity and healthy sleep behaviors—and to help people be more aware of the privacy implications of sensing and inference systems.

Jesús Favela (Pervasive Health department editor) is a professor and Dean of Graduate Studies for the Department of Computer Science at the Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE), where he leads the Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Healthcare Laboratory. His research interests include ubiquitous computing, medical informatics, and human-computer interaction. Favela received his PhD in computer science from MIT. He is a founding member and former president of the Mexican Computer Science Society.

Mike Hazas (Smart Homes department editor) is lecturer in the School of Computing and Communications, Lancaster University. He started his research career in sensing and signal processing for location-aware computing (PhD, University of Cambridge 2003). Mike has more recently focused on developing new understandings of technology, social practice, and sustainability, within and beyond the home. He regularly serves on the PCs for the Ubicomp and Pervasive conference series.

Nayeem Islam is vice president of Qualcomm Research Silicon Valley, where he oversees research in location-based technologies, mobile software and application-acceleration technologies, mobile security, and mobile cloud technologies. Islam has a PhD in computer science from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Yoshihiro Kawahara is an associate professor in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering at the University of Tokyo. His research interests are in the areas of computer networks and pervasive and mobile computing. He is currently interested in developing tools and techniques to develop electrical circuits using off-the-shelf tools such as commodity inkjet printers. Kawahara received his PhD in information communication engineering from the University of Tokyo. He is a member of IEICE, IPSJ, and IEEE.

Vassilis Kostakos is Professor of Human Computer Interaction in the School of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne. His research interests include ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction, the Internet of Things, and social computing. Vassilis received a PhD in computer science from the University of Bath.

Robin Kravets is an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and head of the Mobius group, which researches communication issues in all types of networks that are challenged by mobility. Her research focuses on solutions that enable effective power management, connectivity management, data transport, congestion management, location management, routing, and security.

Andrew L. Kun (Education & Training department editor) is an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of New Hampshire, and a Faculty Fellow at the US DOT Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. His primary research interest is in-vehicle human-computer interaction. He serves as cochair of the Steering Committee of the ACM AutomotiveUI conference series. He received his PhD from the University of New Hampshire in electrical engineering.

James A. Landay is a professor of computer science at Stanford University, specializing in human-computer interaction. Previously, he was a professor of information science at Cornell Tech in New York City and prior to that a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington. His current research interests include technology to support behavior change, demonstrational interfaces, mobile and ubiquitous computing, and user interface design tools. He is the founder and codirector of the World Lab, a joint research and educational effort with Tsinghua University in Beijing. He received his PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Jennifer Mankoff is the Richard E. Ladner Professor in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. She applies a human-centered perspective that combines empirical methods and technical innovation to solve pressing social problems in areas such as accessibility, health and sustainability. Jennifer holds a PhD in computer science from Georgia Tech.

Justin Manweiler is a researcher with the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. He is interested in mobile and ubiquitous computing systems, especially those enhanced through unique cloud services. His experience spans the entire application stack, from the wireless PHY/MAC layer up through the design of distributed architectures. Manweiler received his PhD in computer science from Duke University.

Nicolai Marquardt is a Senior Lecturer in Physical Computing at University College London. He works on projects in the research areas of ubiquitous computing, cross-device interaction, interactive surfaces, sensor-based systems, prototyping toolkits, and physical user interfaces. Nicolai holds a PhD in computer science from the University of Calgary.

Cecilia Mascolo is a reader in mobile systems in the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge. Prior to this, she was with the Department of Computer Science of University College London. She holds an MSc and PhD in computer science from University of Bologna. Mascolo’s research concentrates on mobility data gathering, analysis, modeling, and exploitation through research council and industry-funded multidisciplinary projects. Her research strategy is heavily experimental and deployment oriented. She has published extensively in the areas of mobile sensor networks, mobile network routing, realistic mobility models, and social network analysis. Mascolo has served in the organization committees of many mobile and sensor systems, middleware, software engineering, and data mining conferences and workshops. She is also on the editorial board of IEEE Internet Computing. More details are available at www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~cm542.

Friedemann Mattern is a professor of Computer Science at ETH Zurich. He was the founding director of the Institute for Pervasive Computing and heads the distributed systems and ubiquitous computing research group. Before being appointed by ETH Zurich in 1999, Mattern was a professor at Saarland University and at TU Darmstadt. He received his PhD from the University of Kaiserslautern in 1989.

Stefanie Mueller (Maker Tech department editor) is an assistant professor in the MIT EECS department, joint with MIT MechE, and a member of MIT CSAIL. In her research, she develops novel hardware and software systems that advance personal fabrication technologies. Stefanie’s work has been published at the premier venues for Human-­Computer Interaction, ACM CHI and ACM UIST, and has received several best paper and honorable mention awards. She was also the general co­chair for the ACM Symposium on Computational Fabrication 2017 and the main organizer of the ACM SIGCHI summer school on Computational Fabrication and Smart Matter. In addition, Stefanie has been an invited speaker at universities and research labs, such as MIT, Stanford, UC Berkeley, Harvard, CMU, Cornell, UW, ETH, Microsoft Research, Disney Research, and Adobe Research.

Joseph A. Paradiso is an associate professor at MIT’s Media Arts and Sciences Department, where he directs the Responsive Environments Group and codirects the Things That Think Consortium. His research interests include sensor networks, energy harvesting, ubiquitous computing, and human-computer interaction. He received his PhD in physics from MIT.

Shwetak N. Patel is an associate professor in the departments of Computer Science & Engineering and Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs his research group, the ubicomp lab. His research interests are in the areas of human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, sensor-enabled embedded systems, and user interface software and technology. His research focuses on developing new sensing technologies with a particular emphasis on energy monitoring and health applications for the home. He is also a MacArthur Fellow, Microsoft Research Faculty Fellow, and Sloan Fellow.

Heather Patterson is a senior research scientist at Intel, where she investigates social, legal, and ethical issues arising from emerging technological systems. She also serves as a privacy commissioner to the City of Oakland, where she advises on best practices to protect citizen privacy. Heather’s work is informed by her background in cognitive science (PhD, University of Washington) and law (JD, UC Berkeley).

Sanjay Sarma is the Fred Fort Flowers and Daniel Fort Flowers Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Digital Learning at MIT. Sarma was one of the founders of the Auto-ID Center at MIT, which, along with a number of partner companies and its spin-off  EPCglobal, developed the technical concepts and standards of modern RFID. He also chaired the Auto-ID Research Council consisting of six labs worldwide, which he helped to establish. Sarma has a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. He serves as a permanent guest of the board of GS1 and a member of the board of governors of GS1US. Sarma also serves on the City of Boston’s Complete Streets Advisory Group.

Florian Schaub is an assistant professor of information and electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on understanding privacy behavior and decision making, and helping individuals effectively manage their privacy in complex socio-technological systems. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of Ulm.

Albrecht Schmidt (Human Augmentation department editor) is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Ludwigs-Maximilians-University (LMU) in Munich, Germany, where he heads the Human Centered Ubiquitous Media Group. His research interests are ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction, and context awareness. He has a PhD in computer science from Lancaster University.

James Scott is a researcher in the Sensors and Devices group at Microsoft Research Cambridge. His research interests span a wide range of topics in ubiquitous and pervasive computing, and include novel sensors and devices, mobile interaction, rapid prototyping, wireless and mobile networking, energy management, and security and privacy. He received his PhD from Cambridge University.

Junehwa Song is a professor of the School of Computing and a KAIST-Chair professor, KAIST, Korea. He is also an affiliated professor of the Division of Web Science and Technology, Department of Knowledge Service Engineering, Graduate School of Culture Technology, Institute for Entertainment Engineering, KAIST. Prior to joining KAIST, he worked as a research staff member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. Song received his PhD in computer science from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Kristof Van Laerhoven (Wearable Computing department editor) is a professor of ubiquitous computing at the University of Siegen. His research interests are wearable computing, wireless sensor networks, and machine learning. He has a PhD in computer science from Lancaster University.

Daqing Zhang is a chair professor at the School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science at Peking University and a professor at Telecom SudParis. His research interests include context-aware computing, mobile crowd sensing, contactless sensing, big data analytics, and pervasive elderly care. He has a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”and University of L’Aquila.

Advisory Board

Mahadev “Satya” Satyanarayanan (chair) is the Carnegie Group Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University. He’s an experimental computer scientist who has pioneered research in mobile and pervasive computing, including his work on the open source Coda File System and Odyssey, a set of open source operating system extensions (both part of CMU’s Project Aura). He has also worked on Internet Suspend/Resume and is a coinventor of many supporting technologies, such as data staging, lookaside caching, translucent caching, and application-aware adaptation. He is a fellow of ACM and IEEE, and the founding editor in chief of IEEE Pervasive Computing.

Nigel Davies is a professor of computer science at Lancaster University. His research interests include systems support for mobile and pervasive computing. He focuses in particular on the challenges of creating deployable mobile and ubiquitous computing systems that can be used and evaluated “in the wild.”

Maria R. Ebling is a research staff member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, where she manages a group building middleware to support context-sensitive computing with a focus on user privacy concerns. Her research interests include pervasive computing, context-aware computing, mobile computing, distributed systems, privacy, and human-computer interaction. She received her PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Daniel Siewiorek is the director of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include wearable computing, fault-tolerant computing, and reliability.

Roy Want is a research scientist at Google. His research interests include mobile and ubiquitous computing, wireless protocols, embedded systems, and automatic identification. He received his PhD for his work on “reliable management of voice in a distributed system” from Cambridge University. While at Olivetti Research (1988–91), he developed the Active Badge, a system for automatically locating people in a building. He joined Xerox PARC’s Ubiquitous Computing program in 1991 and led a project called PARCTab, one of the first context-aware computer systems. In 2000, he joined Intel Labs, where he held the position of senior principal engineer working on the Dynamic Composable Computing project. He is currently chair of ACM SIGMOBILE, and a Fellow of IEEE and the ACM.